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Effects of Environmental Factors and Metal Ions on Growth of the Red Alga Gracilaria Chorda Holmes (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta)

Abstract

Gracilaria is a potentially valuable source of marine biopolymers such as proteins and polysaccharides. In order to select suitable culture conditions, growth and tolerance of Gracilaria chorda Holmes from Shikoku Island in southwest Japan were investigated under variations of temperature (5–30 C), photon irradiance (20–120 μmol photons m−2 s−1), and photoperiod (12:12 h, 14:10 h light:dark regime) in a unialgal culture. Gracilaria chorda showed wide tolerances for all factors investigated, which is characteristic of eurythermal species. Maximum growth was observed at 18–24 C. The optimum photon irradiance for the algal growth was 60–120 μmol photons m−2s−1. Instead of using ordinary sea salt (NaCl) to prepare artificial seawater, ultra pure salt was adopted. Gracilaria chorda grew faster in artificial seawater made with ultra-pure salt than that made with ordinary sea salt, probably because the former medium was clear, while the latter was milky. Effects of some metal ions on the growth were tested with artificial seawater. Iron ions affected algal growth, but cobalt ions did not. This study enables us to determine suitable culture conditions for G. chorda. A scaled-up 30 l culture of G. chorda under such conditions was successful.

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Kakita, H., Kamishima, H. Effects of Environmental Factors and Metal Ions on Growth of the Red Alga Gracilaria Chorda Holmes (Gracilariales, Rhodophyta). J Appl Phycol 18, 469 (2006). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10811-006-9047-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10811-006-9047-5

Key words

  • Gracilaria
  • growth
  • environmental factors
  • metal ions
  • ultra pure salt
  • artificial seawater