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Where are We Standing and Where Should We Be Going? Gender and Climate Change Adaptation Behavior

Abstract

Climate change poses as one of the greatest ethical challenges of the contemporary era and which is rapidly affecting all sectors and ecosystems, including natural ecosystems and human and social environments. The impacts on human societies, and societies’ ability to mitigate and adapt to these changes and to adhere to ethical principles are influenced by various factors, including gender. Therefore, this study aimed to design a model of climate change adaptation behavior among rice farmers in Mazandaran Province, northern Iran, based on gender analysis (IUCN, UNDP and GGCA in Training manual on gender and climate change, 2009) and using the developed model of protection motivation theory (Bockarjova and Steg in Glob Environ Change 28:276–288, 2014). For this purpose, 173 female and 233 male rice farmers in Mazandaran Province were selected through stratified random sampling. The results showed that threat and coping appraisal had positive and significant effects on climate change adaptation behavior in both groups. Additionally, men’s and women’s perceived severity had the greatest impact on threat appraisal, and response costs had the greatest impact on their coping appraisal of climate change. Given that climate change adaptation behavior has been largely dependent on the development of ethical principles and the behavior of men and women toward climate change and based on the research findings, some suggestions are recommended at the mega (international), macro (governmental and legislative), meso (related organizations) and micro (rice farmers) levels for male and female rice farmers to adapt to the climate change phenomenon.

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Source: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0005835.g001

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Acknowledgements

Special thanks for the male and female rice farmers who participated in this study. We appreciate the thoughtful suggestions and comments from two anonymous reviewers which helped in improving the quality of this research.

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The present article is taken from Imaneh Goli’s thesis entitled “ Designing Behavioral Adaptation of Mazandaran’s rice farmers to climate changes Based on Gender Analysis Approach” under the supervision of Dr. Maryam Omidi Najafabadi and Dr. Farhad Lashgarara.

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Goli, I., Omidi Najafabadi, M. & Lashgarara, F. Where are We Standing and Where Should We Be Going? Gender and Climate Change Adaptation Behavior. J Agric Environ Ethics 33, 187–218 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10806-020-09822-3

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10806-020-09822-3

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Adaptation
  • Gender
  • Protection motivation theory