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Student Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty at a Cyber-University in South Korea

Abstract

With the increase in students taking online classes to complete their degrees, there is a corresponding increase of research into how students might participate in these online classes. One way in which students may participate, but subvert the parameters of the online class they are taking, is by engaging in academic dishonesty. Academic dishonesty can reduce the quality of the learning experience for students, and reduce the validity and trust in online class’s assessment. For this reason, understanding how student perceive their cheating behavior is useful for researchers. This paper looks at the interview responses of a group of students taking cyber university classes to gain insight into their perceptions and motivations for cheating. The responses were varied, but showed the ad-hoc nature of the behavior and that students felt that academic dishonesty was a natural aspect of their learning experience.

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Correspondence to Jamie Costley.

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Costley, J. Student Perceptions of Academic Dishonesty at a Cyber-University in South Korea. J Acad Ethics 17, 205–217 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-018-9318-1

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-018-9318-1

Keywords

  • Academic dishonesty
  • Cheating
  • Cyber university
  • Interviews
  • Plagiarism