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Comparing Business School Faculty Classification for Perceptions of Student Cheating

Abstract

Faculty continue to address academic dishonesty in their classes. In this follow-up to an earlier study on general perceived faculty student cheating, using a sample of business school faculty, we compared three levels of faculty classification: full-time non-tenure track (NTT, n = 86), full-time tenured/tenure-track (TT, n = 66), and part-time adjuncts (A, n = 71). Results showed that NTTs perceived higher levels for three different types of student cheating, i.e., paper-based, forbidden teamwork, and hiring someone to take an exam. In addition, NTTs were more likely to report a student for cheating. NTTs reported a higher course load and average class size, and average class size was positively related to all five types of cheating measured. Given the predicted increase in NTTs across all disciplines, making sure that all faculty, (but especially NTTs), have the resources needed to deter student cheating is important. All faculty have an obligation to hold students accountable for their behavior. Individual integrity is paramount; and it is what employers expect. Regardless of the chosen field or discipline, an employer’s expectations, in terms of character, is to hire individuals who possess a level of honesty that is above reproach. Addressing cheating is an obligation that all faculty need to address purposefully. Providing resources to help faculty address cheating is critical. Resources might include conflict resolution training to provide instructors with the necessary guidance so that they can better handle these difficult situations. This is important not only for the student while in school, but also for a university/college’s reputation.

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Correspondence to Gary Blau.

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Blau, G., Szewczuk, R., Fitzgerald, J. et al. Comparing Business School Faculty Classification for Perceptions of Student Cheating. J Acad Ethics 16, 301–315 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-018-9315-4

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Keywords

  • Faculty classifications
  • Non-tenure track faculty
  • Faculty perceptions of student cheating
  • Types of student cheating
  • Faculty reporting cheating