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Developing a Revised Cross-Cultural Academic Integrity Questionnaire (CCAIQ-2)

Abstract

Understanding and measuring levels of academic integrity within higher education institutions across the world is an important area of study in the era of educational internationalization. Developing a cross-cultural measure will undoubtedly assist in creating standardization processes and add to the discourse on cross-cultural understanding on what constitutes honest and dishonest action in the higher education context. This study has used a combination of exploratory and confirmatory factor analytical procedures to validate a previously published questionnaire, namely the cross-cultural academic integrity questionnaire (CCAIQ). Inspection of response distributions was also undertaken. Primary participants in this study were from Iran (n = 216), and secondary reference participants were from New Zealand (n = 366) and Nigeria (n = 330). The findings indicate that a revised questionnaire (CCAIQ-2) better represents the data obtained from all three regions. Three CCAIQ-2 domains are proposed: cheating, collusion and complying. However, the response distributions (skewness and kurtosis) indicated differences among the three groups, further suggesting that the theoretical constructs developed through factors analysis may not represent equivalence in terms of cross-cultural understanding. This research will inevitably create international debate on the measurement of integrity and how this measurement process can be used to establish internationally recognized and accountable educational regulations.

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Correspondence to Marcus A. Henning.

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Henning, M.A., Nejadghanbar, H. & Abaraogu, U. Developing a Revised Cross-Cultural Academic Integrity Questionnaire (CCAIQ-2). J Acad Ethics 16, 241–255 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-018-9306-5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-018-9306-5

Keywords

  • Academic integrity
  • Higher education
  • Dishonest and honest behaviours
  • Questionnaire design