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Self-Reported Examination Cheating of Alumni and Enrolled Students: Evidence from Ghana

Abstract

This paper investigates differences in the prevalence of self-reported examination cheating behaviours and perception of peer cheating between enrolled students and graduates. A convenience sample of 344 respondents selected from a Ghanaian polytechnic completed self-administered questionnaires. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics, Chi-square test of independence and Mann Whitney test. “Permitting another student to copy your answers during an exam” was the topmost exam cheating method among students. Graduates were more likely than enrolled students to self-report higher examination cheating behaviours. Enrolled students were less likely than graduates to perceive higher levels of peer cheating. Future studies should consider using graduates in students’ cheating studies in order to validate the results of the study. This study extends the extant literature on academic dishonesty as it provides insight on self-reported cheating between students and graduates.

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Correspondence to Christopher Mensah.

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Mensah, C., Azila-Gbettor, E.M. & Asimah, V. Self-Reported Examination Cheating of Alumni and Enrolled Students: Evidence from Ghana. J Acad Ethics 16, 89–102 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-017-9286-x

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10805-017-9286-x

Keywords

  • Examination cheating
  • Enrolled students
  • Alumni
  • Polytechnic
  • Ghana