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Journal of Academic Ethics

, Volume 12, Issue 4, pp 271–286 | Cite as

Fostering Collective Ethical Capacity within the Teaching Profession

  • Déirdre SmithEmail author
Article
  • 634 Downloads

Abstract

A depth of ethical knowledge and understanding are essential for the enactment of ethical decisions and actions. Ethics is the foundational core for democratic teaching, learning and educational leadership. It is imperative that the development of ethical insight and the formation of an ethical stance become fundamental elements of both initial and continuing teacher education. Educators must be adept at cultivating ethical cultures within schools and districts. They need to know how to effectively foster the collective ethical capacity of all those with whom they are called to serve. To ensure the highest level of ethical professional practice and action, the collective ethical knowledge, sensitivity, awareness, and efficacy of the teaching profession must continue to evolve. The ongoing ethical formation of the teaching profession is essential for the public’s continued trust and confidence in the ethical actions and practices of the educational community. Educative processes designed to enhance the collective ethical capacity of the teaching profession are explored in this inquiry. Critical reflection and various dialogic processes focusing on the lived ethical experiences encountered within teaching were used for fostering the ethical leadership and decision making of educators.

Keywords

Ethical knowledge Ethical leadership Lived experience Educational efficacy Critical reflection Dialogic process 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Manager, Standards of Practice and Education UnitOntario College of TeachersTorontoCanada

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