Table 5 Correlations and descriptive statistics for contextual and well-being variables (N = 834)

From: Happily Stressed: The Complexity of Well-Being in Midlife

Variables 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9
1.Age         
2.Gendera − .09**        
3.Education levelb .10** − .14**       
4.Relationship statusc − .05 − .16** .13**      
5.Work hoursd − .14** − .15** .20** .12**     
6.Positive well-being .01 .07 .03 .03 − .01    
7.Negative well-being − .01 .05 − .13** − .09** − .16** − .53**   
8.Enjoyment − .04 .12** .03 .11** .09 .36** − .25**  
9.Stress − .04 − .01 − .01 .07* .04 − .31** .45** − .03
M 5.49 .54 2.23 .81 .68 12.10 11.12 7.28 2.78
SD 5.64 .50 .76 .39 .47 2.61 3.61 1.94 1.73
Observed range 40–60 0–1 1–3 0–1 0–1 4–16 5–20 0–11 0–8
  1. *p < .05; **p < .01
  2. aGender: 0 = male, 1 = female
  3. bRelationship status: 0 = occasional dating or not currently dating, 1 = married, cohabiting, or close girl/boyfriend
  4. cWork hours: 0 = 0–20 h per week, 1 = 21 or more hours per week
  5. dAA = African Americans; coded as the referent group. Age and education level (where 1 = high school diploma or less, 2 = some college or vocational school, 3 = 4-year degree or more) were continuous variables