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Music and Stress

Abstract

Myths about the power of music to regulate and change emotional states are found in each culture. Googling the words “music and stress” produces promises for different types of music specially designed to assist managing stress. Music therapists are familiar with using different techniques to reduce stress with different populations. This paper examines both the application of music to stress management and the neurological and physiological mechanisms of stress that can be modulated by music.

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Correspondence to Nechama Yehuda.

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Yehuda, N. Music and Stress. J Adult Dev 18, 85–94 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10804-010-9117-4

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Keywords

  • Music
  • Stress
  • Emotions
  • Music therapy
  • Psychology of music
  • Biological effects of music