Journal of Adult Development

, Volume 17, Issue 2, pp 70–80 | Cite as

Wisdom and Positive Psychosocial Values in Young Adulthood

Article

Abstract

The current project investigates wisdom and positive psychosocial characteristics in young adults in a series of three overlapping studies. Study 1 (N = 61) investigated wisdom and ego-integrity, values, and life attitudes. Results indicated that wisdom was positively correlated with ego-integrity and self/other-enhancing values, as well as a sense of personal coherence; wisdom was negatively correlated with hedonistic values. Study 2 (N = 62) investigated wisdom and attachment anxiety/avoidance and life attitudes. Results replicated the findings for the life attitudes of Coherence and Existential Vacuum demonstrated in study 1 and extended these findings by showing predicted correlations among wisdom and four other life attitudes, as well as demonstrated negative correlations among wisdom and attachment avoidance and attachment anxiety. Study 3 (N = 62) showed that wisdom positively predicted attributional complexity, a variable found to reduce social judgement biases. Implications and future directions are discussed.

Keywords

Self-Assessed Wisdom Scale Correspondence bias Values Attachment Attitudes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The author gratefully acknowledges the data entry assistance of Jeffrey Markusof.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Psychology DepartmentLangara CollegeVancouverCanada

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