Skip to main content

Concurrent Validity of the ABAS-II Questionnaire with the Vineland II Interview for Adaptive Behavior in a Pediatric ASD Sample: High Correspondence Despite Systematically Lower Scores

Abstract

We examined the correlation between interviewer-administered Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale II (VABS-II) and the parent-rated Adaptive Behavior Assessment System II (ABAS-II) questionnaire in 352 participants (ages 1.5–20.8 years) with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to determine if ABAS could be used as a screen to reduce the number of VABS interviews. Corresponding domain scores between the two measures were highly correlated but scores were significantly lower on the ABAS-II. Screening with ABAS-II significantly reduced the number of VABS-II interviews required with little cost to overall accuracy. The ABAS-II provides a cost- and time-saving alternative to the VABS-II to rule out functional impairment; however, scores are not strictly comparable between the two measures.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Fig. 1
Fig. 2

References

  1. Ament, K., Mejia, A., Buhlman, R., Erklin, S., Caffo, B., Mostofsky, S., et al. (2015). Evidence for specificity of motor impairments in catching and balance in children with autism. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(3), 742–751. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-014-2229-0.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  2. American Psychiatric Association. (2000). Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th edition, text revision). Washington, DC.

  3. American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (DSM-5®). Washington, DC.

  4. Ashwood, K. L., Tye, C., Azadi, B., Cartwright, S., Asherson, P., & Bolton, P. (2015). Brief report: adaptive functioning in children with ASD, ADHD and ASD + ADHD. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 45(7), 2235–2242. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-014-2352-y.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  5. Balboni, G., Incognito, O., Belacchi, C., Bonichini, S., & Cubelli, R. (2017). Vineland-II adaptive behavior profile of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder or specific learning disorders. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 61, 55–65. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ridd.2016.12.003.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  6. Bentz, M., Jepsen, J. R. M., Pedersen, T., Bulik, C. M., Pedersen, L., Pagsberg, A. K., et al. (2017). Impairment of social function in young females with recent-onset anorexia nervosa and recovered individuals. Journal of Adolescent Health, 60(1), 23–32. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jadohealth.2016.08.011.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  7. Cleveland, W. S., Grosse, E., & Shyu, W. M. (1991). Local regression models. In J. M. Chambers & T. J. Hastie (Eds.), Statistical Models in S (pp. 309–376). Pacific Grove, CA: Wadsworth & Brooks/Cole.

    Google Scholar 

  8. Goldstein, S., & Naglieri, J. A. (2009). Defining the evolving concept of impairment. In Assessing impairment: From theory to practice. (pp. 1–4). New York, NY, US: Springer Science + Business Media. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-0-387-87542-2_1

  9. Harrison, P. L., & Oakland, T. (2003). Adaptive behavior assessment system® Second Edition ABAS®-II. San Antonio: Harcourt.

    Google Scholar 

  10. Hasan, C. Z. C., Jailani, R., Md Tahir, N., & Ilias, S. (2017). The analysis of three-dimensional ground reaction forces during gait in children with autism spectrum disorders. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 66, 55–63. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.RIDD.2017.02.015.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  11. Kanne, S. M., Gerber, A. J., Quirmbach, L. M., Sparrow, S. S., Cicchetti, D. V., & Saulnier, C. A. (2011). The role of adaptive behavior in autism spectrum disorders: Implications for functional outcome. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 41(8), 1007–1018. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-010-1126-4.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  12. Klin, A., Saulnier, C. A., Sparrow, S. S., Cicchetti, D. V., Volkmar, F. R., & Lord, C. (2007). Social and communication abilities and disabilities in higher functioning individuals with autism spectrum disorders: The Vineland and the ADOS. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 37(4), 748–759. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-006-0229-4.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  13. Lopata, C., Smith, R. A., Volker, M. A., Thomeer, M. L., Lee, G. K., & McDonald, C. A. (2013). Comparison of adaptive behavior measures for children with HFASDs. Autism Research and Treatment. https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/415989.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  14. Mano, H., Fukiwara, S., & Haga, N. (2018). Adaptive behaviour and motor skills in children with upper limb deficiency. Prosthetics and Orthotics International, 42(2), 236–240. https://doi.org/10.1177/0309364617718411.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  15. McPhillips, M., Finlay, J., Bejerot, S., & Hanley, M. (2014). Motor deficits in children with autism spectrum disorder: a cross-syndrome study. Autism Research: Official Journal of the International Society for Autism Research, 7(6), 664–676. https://doi.org/10.1002/aur.1408.

    Article  Google Scholar 

  16. Rutter, M., Bailey, A., Berument, S. K., Lord, C., & Pickles, A. (2003). Social Communication Questionnaire (SCQ).

  17. Rutter, M., Le Couteur, A., & Lord, C. (2003b). Autism diagnostic interview—Revised. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.

    Google Scholar 

  18. SAS Institute Inc. (2012). SAS 9.4. Cary, NC.

  19. Sikora, D. M., Vora, P., Coury, D. L., & Rosenberg, D. (2012). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms, adaptive functioning, and quality of life in children with autism spectrum disorder. Pediatrics, 130(Supplement 2), S91–S97. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2012-0900g.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  20. Silverstein, F. S., Slomine, B. S., Christensen, J., Holubkov, R., Page, K., Dean, J. M., et al. (2016). Functional outcome trajectories after out-of-hospital pediatric cardiac arrest. Critical Care Medicine, 44(12), e1165–e1174. https://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000002003.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  21. Sparow, S. S., Cicchetti, D. V., & Balla, D. A. (2005). Vineland adaptive behavior scales, Second Edition (VinelandTM-II). Circle Pines: American Guidance Service.

    Google Scholar 

  22. Swanson, J., Deutsch, C., Cantwell, D., Posner, M., Kennedy, J. L., Barr, C. L., et al. (2001). Genes and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Clinical Neuroscience Research, 1(3), 207–216. https://doi.org/10.1016/S1566-2772(01)00007-X.

  23. Tan, S. S., van der Slot, W. M. A., Ketelaar, M., Becher, J. G., Dallmeijer, A. J., Smits, D.-W., et al. (2016). Factors contributing to the longitudinal development of social participation in individuals with cerebral palsy. Research in Developmental Disabilities, 57, 125–135. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.RIDD.2016.03.015.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

  24. The R Foundation for Statistical Computing. (2015). R version 3.2.2.

  25. Weiss, M. J., Moran, M. F., Parker, M. E., & Foley, J. T. (2013). Gait analysis of teenagers and young adults diagnosed with autism and severe verbal communication disorders. Frontiers in Integrative Neuroscience, 7, 33. https://doi.org/10.3389/fnint.2013.00033.

    Article  PubMed  PubMed Central  Google Scholar 

  26. Yerys, B. E., Bertollo, J. R., Pandey, J., Guy, L., & Schultz, R. T. (2019). Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder symptoms are associated with lower adaptive behavior skills in children with autism. Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 58(5), 525–533.e3. https://doi.org/10.1016/J.JAAC.2018.08.017.

    Article  PubMed  Google Scholar 

Download references

Acknowledgments

This research was supported by the grant IDS-I l-02 (Anagnostou, Lerch) from the Ontario Brain Institute. We thank all staff involved in data collection and families for volunteering their time and effort.

Author Contributions

AD, MM, RS and JC to the study conception and design. Material preparation, data collection and analysis were performed by all authors. The first draft of the manuscript was written by AD and all authors commented on previous versions of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Funding

This research was supported by the grant IDS-I l-02 (Anagnostou, Lerch) from the Ontario Brain Institute.

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Jennifer Crosbie.

Ethics declarations

Conflict of interest

RS is the TD Bank Group Chair in Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, owns equity in Ehave, and has consulted for Highland Therapeutics, Purdue Pharma, E Lilly Corp and Ehave. EA has received consultation fees from ROCHe and Quadrant, royalties from APPI and Springer, research funding from ROCHe, in kind supports from AMO Pharma, and editorial honoraria from Wiley. EA holds a provisional patent for the device, “Anxiety Meter”. RN has received grant funding from Hoffman-La Roche Limited. All other authors no conflicts to declare.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in this study involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, The Hospital for Sick Children, McMaster’s Children’s Hospital, and the Lawson Health Research Institute, as well as the National Council on Ethics in Human Research and with the 1964 Declaration of Helsinki and its later amendments. This study was approved by the Research Ethics Board of each institution: Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital, The Hospital for Sick Children, McMaster’s Children’s Hospital, and the Lawson Health Research Institute.

Informed Consent

Informed consent, and verbal assent when applicable, approved by each institution’s Research Ethics Board were obtained from all participants.

Additional information

Publisher's Note

Springer Nature remains neutral with regard to jurisdictional claims in published maps and institutional affiliations.

Electronic supplementary material

Below is the link to the electronic supplementary material.

Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 248 kb)

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Verify currency and authenticity via CrossMark

Cite this article

Dupuis, A., Moon, M.J., Brian, J. et al. Concurrent Validity of the ABAS-II Questionnaire with the Vineland II Interview for Adaptive Behavior in a Pediatric ASD Sample: High Correspondence Despite Systematically Lower Scores. J Autism Dev Disord 51, 1417–1427 (2021). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-020-04597-y

Download citation

Keywords

  • ABAS
  • Vineland
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Children
  • Adaptive behaviors