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Promoting a Collective Voice from Parents, Educators and Allied Health Professionals on the Educational Needs of Students on the Autism Spectrum

Abstract

Providing support for the educational needs of students on the autism spectrum continues to be challenging. Findings from this survey of parents, teachers and specialist staff highlight the need for collaboration between stakeholders who support the education of these students. The main themes to emerge were for school staff to be equipped with the knowledge and expertise to support each student in their learning, and for support with social/emotional needs. Findings highlighted the need for a transparent process for building school capacity to translate research and knowledge into practice by all stakeholders. This collective voice is important to ensure the needs of these students are identified and that appropriate support is implemented to maximise the educational success of these students.

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Notes

  1. Pseudonyms have been used throughout the paper.

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BS conceived this research and designed the intervention; DK, DT, AW and SB participated in the design and interpretation of the data; BS, MT, JD and SW performed analysis; BS, MT and JD wrote the paper and participated in the revisions of it. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Correspondence to Beth Saggers.

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Saggers, B., Tones, M., Dunne, J. et al. Promoting a Collective Voice from Parents, Educators and Allied Health Professionals on the Educational Needs of Students on the Autism Spectrum. J Autism Dev Disord 49, 3845–3865 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-019-04097-8

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Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Educational needs
  • Parents
  • Educators
  • Specialists
  • Stakeholder voice