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Life Satisfaction in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder

Abstract

We provided evidence regarding the reliability and validity of measures of assets and life satisfaction (LS) for adolescents with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We identified levels of LS within this population, compared these levels to those of typically developing adolescents, and described the relation between assets and LS. Forty-six adolescents with ASD and their caregivers completed questionnaires assessing LS and assets. Preliminary support was provided for the internal consistency reliability and validity of these measures in adolescents with ASD. Youth with ASD reported moderate to high levels of LS; these were lower than those of typically developing peers. Age moderated the relation between self-reported LS and some assets. Implications were discussed within the context of Schalock’s (J Disabil Policy Stud 14:204–215, 2004) emerging disability paradigm.

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Acknowledgments

This study was supported by a $5,000 grant from the SPARC Graduate Research Grant program at the University of South Carolina. This study was conducted in order to complete the requirements for Kathleen Franke’s doctoral dissertation.

Funding

This study was funded by the SPARC Graduate Research Grant program at the University of South Carolina.

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Authors

Contributions

KBF conceived of the study, participated in its design and coordination, performed the statistical analyses, participated in interpretation of the data, and drafted the manuscript. KH, ESH, and KF participated in the study design and interpretation of the data. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Kathleen Blackburn Franke.

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All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in this study involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Franke, K.B., Hills, K., Huebner, E.S. et al. Life Satisfaction in Adolescents with Autism Spectrum Disorder. J Autism Dev Disord 49, 1205–1218 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-018-3822-4

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Keywords

  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • High-functioning autism spectrum disorder
  • Adolescence
  • Life satisfaction
  • Psychosocial assets
  • Positive psychology