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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 48, Issue 12, pp 4231–4249 | Cite as

Psychometric Evaluation of the Short Sensory Profile in Youth with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Zachary J. Williams
  • Michelle D. Failla
  • Katherine O. Gotham
  • Tiffany G. Woynaroski
  • Carissa Cascio
Original Paper

Abstract

The Short Sensory Profile (SSP) is one of the most commonly used measures of sensory features in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), but psychometric studies in this population are limited. Using confirmatory factor analysis, we evaluated the structural validity of the SSP subscales in ASD children. Confirmatory factor models exhibited poor fit, and a follow-up exploratory factor analysis suggested a 9-factor structure that only replicated three of the seven original subscales. Secondary analyses suggest that while reliable, the SSP total score is substantially biased by individual differences on dimensions other than the general factor. Overall, our findings discourage the use of the SSP total score and most subscale scores in children with ASD. Implications for future research are discussed.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Sensory Short Sensory Profile Factor analysis Psychometric Validity 

Notes

Acknowledgments

Data and/or research tools used in the preparation of this manuscript were obtained from the NIH-supported National Database for Autism Research (NDAR). NDAR is a collaborative informatics system created by the National Institutes of Health to provide a national resource to support and accelerate research in autism. This manuscript reflects the views of the authors and may not reflect the opinions or views of the NIH or of the Submitters submitting original data to NDAR. The authors would like to thank Dr. Grace Baranek for her input regarding our recommendations for the use of the Sensory Experiences Questionnaire.

Author Contributions

ZJW conceived of the study, performed and interpreted all statistical analyses, and drafted the manuscript; CC participated in the design and coordination of the study, gathered data from both samples, and helped to draft the manuscript; MDF, KOG, and TGW all contributed to the interpretation of the data and helped to draft the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Funding

This study was funded by the National Institutes of Health under the following award numbers: T32 GM007347, R01 MH102272, K01 MH 90232, R21 MH 109225, R21 MH10132, UL1 TR000445 from NCATS/NIH, and U54 HD083211.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that they have no conflicts of interest with respect to their authorship or the publication of this article.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

Supplementary material

10803_2018_3678_MOESM1_ESM.docx (43 kb)
Supplementary material 1 (DOCX 42 KB)

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© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Medical Scientist Training ProgramVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesVanderbilt University School of MedicineNashvilleUSA
  3. 3.Vanderbilt Kennedy CenterVanderbilt University Medical CenterNashvilleUSA
  4. 4.Department of Hearing and Speech SciencesVanderbilt University Medical CenterNashvilleUSA

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