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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 48, Issue 10, pp 3586–3595 | Cite as

Randomized Control Trial of COMPASS for Improving Transition Outcomes of Students with Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • Lisa A. RubleEmail author
  • John H. McGrew
  • Michael Toland
  • Nancy Dalrymple
  • Medina Adams
  • Claire Snell-Rood
Original Article

Abstract

The postsecondary outcomes of individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are significantly worse than peers with other disabilities. One problem is the lack of empirically-supported transition planning interventions to guide services and help produce better outcomes. We applied an implementation science approach to adapt and modify an evidence-based consultation intervention originally tested with young children called the Collaborative Model for Promoting Competence and Success (COMPASS; Ruble et al., The collaborative model for promoting competence and success for students with ASD. Springer, New York, 2012a) and evaluate it for efficacy in a randomized controlled trial for transition-age youth. Results replicated findings with younger students with ASD that IEP outcomes were higher for COMPASS compared to the placebo control group (d = 2.1). Consultant fidelity was high and teacher adherence improved over time, replicating the importance of ongoing teacher coaching.

Keywords

Autism Transition COMPASS RCT IEP outcomes 

Notes

Acknowledgments

We are grateful to the teachers, families, and children who generously donated their time and effort. We extend our thanks to special education directors and principals for allowing their teachers to participate.

Author Contributions

LR and JM conceived the study, participated in its design and coordination and drafted the manuscript. ND and MA participated in the coordination of the study.MT participated in measurement and draft of the manuscript. CSR participated in the draft of the manuscript.

Funding

This work was supported by Grant Number 5R34MH104208 from the National Institute of Mental Health. The content is solely the responsibility of the authors and does not necessarily represent the official views of the National Institute of Mental Health or the National Institutes of Health.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

The authors declare that there have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in this study were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institution and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational, School, and Counseling PsychologyUniversity of KentuckyLexingtonUSA
  2. 2.PsychologyIndiana-University-Purdue University at IndianapolisIndianapolisUSA
  3. 3.BloomingtonUSA
  4. 4.Community Health Sciences Division, School of Public HealthUniversity of California, BerkeleyBerkeleyUSA

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