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Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 48, Issue 5, pp 1612–1622 | Cite as

Sibling Relationships: Parent–Child Agreement and Contributions of Siblings With and Without ASD

  • Megan L. Braconnier
  • Marika C. Coffman
  • Nicole Kelso
  • Julie M. Wolf
Original Paper

Abstract

Research on the experiences of siblings of individuals with ASD and the quality of their sibling relationships has yielded mixed results. The present study examined the significance of parent- versus child-report of both positive and negative behaviors exhibited by siblings and their brothers and sisters with ASD within sibling dyads. Findings indicated that siblings were more positive in their assessment of the sibling relationship than were their parents. Siblings exhibited more positive behaviors within the sibling relationship than did their brothers and sisters with ASD, and were recipients of aggression. These findings are consistent with prior research suggesting that siblings tend to take on a caretaking role, and point to important targets for intervention.

Keywords

Siblings Sibling relationships Parent–child agreement Autism spectrum disorder Stakeholders 

Notes

Acknowledgments

The authors would like to acknowledge the following individuals who contributed to various aspects of this research: Ligia Antezana, Jessica Bradshaw, Lauren Delk, Rebecca Doggett, Reina Factor, Tyler Hassenfeldt, Lauren Herlihy, Cara Keifer, John Richey, Angela Scarpa-Friedman, Andrea Trubanova, and Avery Voos. We would also like to thank the families who participated in this research.

Author Contributions

MB assisted with statistical analysis, contributed to interpretation of results and drafted the majority of the manuscript; MC participated in study design, data collection, and interpretation of results, and oversaw study implementation at the Virginia Tech site; NK contributed to study design and data collection; JW conceived of the study and its design, oversaw study implementation at the Yale University site, contributed to data collection, statistical analysis, and interpretation of results, and drafted portions of the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

Funding

This work was funded by grants from the Organization for Autism Research (Graduate Research Grant Competition, MC) and the Virginia Tech Center for Autism Research (Hulick Serving Spirit Scholarship, MC). A subset of these data was presented at the 2016 International Meeting for Autism Research.

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Conflict of interest

Megan L. Braconnier declares that she has no conflict of interest. Marika C. Coffman declares that she has no conflict of interest. Nicole Kelso declares that she has no conflict of interest. Julie M. Wolf declares that she has no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants included in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yale Child Study Center, Yale School of MedicineYale UniversityNew HavenUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyVirginia Polytechnic Institute and State UniversityBlacksburgUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  4. 4.Department of PsychologySt. John’s UniversityQueensUSA

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