Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes

Abstract

This study describes the profile of repetitive behaviour in individuals with Williams syndrome, utilising cross-syndrome comparisons with people with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes. The Repetitive Behaviour Questionnaire was administered to caregivers of adults with Williams (n = 96), Prader–Willi (n = 103) and Down (n = 78) syndromes. There were few group differences, although participants with Williams syndrome were more likely to show body stereotypies. Individuals with Williams syndrome also showed more hoarding and less tidying behaviours than those with Down syndrome. IQ and adaptive ability were negatively associated with repetitive questioning in people with Williams syndrome. The profile of repetitive behaviour amongst individuals with Williams syndrome was similar to the comparison syndromes. The cognitive mechanisms underlying these behaviours in genetic syndromes warrant further investigation.

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Acknowledgments

This study is based on several earlier studies. It is funded by the charity Cerebra, Cornelia de Lange Syndrome Foundation, Williams Syndrome Foundation and Fondation LeJeune.

Funding

This study was funded by Cerebra, the Cornelia de Lange Foundation, Fondation LeJeune and the Williams Syndrome Foundation.

Funding

This study was funded by Cerebra, the Cornelia de Lange Foundation, Fondation LeJeune and the Williams Syndrome Foundation.

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Authors

Contributions

RR—Data analysis, data interpretation, writing, CO—Data interpretation, writing, JM—Data collection, writing, DA—Data collection, KB—Data collection, CB - Data collection, PH - Data interpretation, writing, LN - Data collection, CS—Data collection, JW—Data analysis, data interpretation, writing.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to R. Royston.

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The authors declare they have no conflict of interest.

Informed consent

Informed consent was obtained from individuals who had the capacity to provide consent themselves. For those who did not have capacity to provide their own consent, parents or carers were able to act as consultees. Consultees were asked to advise on what the wishes of the individual would be if they were able to consent from themselves.

Research Involving Human Participants and/or Animals

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

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Royston, R., Oliver, C., Moss, J. et al. Brief Report: Repetitive Behaviour Profiles in Williams syndrome: Cross Syndrome Comparisons with Prader–Willi and Down syndromes. J Autism Dev Disord 48, 326–331 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-017-3319-6

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Keywords

  • Williams syndrome
  • Prader–Willi syndrome
  • Down syndrome
  • Repetitive behaviour