The Accuracy of the ADOS-2 in Identifying Autism among Adults with Complex Psychiatric Conditions

  • Brenna B. Maddox
  • Edward S. Brodkin
  • Monica E. Calkins
  • Kathleen Shea
  • Katherine Mullan
  • Jack Hostager
  • David S. Mandell
  • Judith S. Miller
Original Paper

DOI: 10.1007/s10803-017-3188-z

Cite this article as:
Maddox, B.B., Brodkin, E.S., Calkins, M.E. et al. J Autism Dev Disord (2017). doi:10.1007/s10803-017-3188-z

Abstract

The Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2), Module 4 is considered a “gold-standard” instrument for diagnosing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in adults. Although the ADOS-2 shows good sensitivity and specificity in lab-based settings, it is unknown whether these results hold in community clinics that serve a more psychiatrically impaired population. This study is the first to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the ADOS-2 among adults in community mental health centers (n = 75). The ADOS-2 accurately identified all adults with ASD; however, it also had a high rate of false positives among adults with psychosis (30%). Findings serve as a reminder that social communication difficulties measured by the ADOS-2 are not specific to ASD, particularly in clinically complex settings.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule Adults Psychosis Community mental health 

Funding information

Funder NameGrant NumberFunding Note
National Institute of Mental Health
  • R34MH100356

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brenna B. Maddox
    • 1
    • 2
  • Edward S. Brodkin
    • 3
  • Monica E. Calkins
    • 4
  • Kathleen Shea
    • 1
    • 5
  • Katherine Mullan
    • 1
  • Jack Hostager
    • 1
  • David S. Mandell
    • 1
  • Judith S. Miller
    • 2
  1. 1.Center for Mental Health Policy and Services Research, Department of PsychiatryPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  2. 2.Center for Autism ResearchThe Children’s Hospital of PhiladelphiaPhiladelphiaUSA
  3. 3.Center for Neurobiology and Behavior, Department of PsychiatryPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  4. 4.Neuropsychiatry Section, Department of PsychiatryPerelman School of Medicine at the University of PennsylvaniaPhiladelphiaUSA
  5. 5.Collaborative on Community Inclusion of Individuals with Psychiatric Disabilities, Department of Rehabilitation SciencesTemple UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

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