Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 47, Issue 8, pp 2401–2409 | Cite as

Exploring the Components of Advanced Theory of Mind in Autism Spectrum Disorder

  • C. Pedreño
  • E. Pousa
  • J. B. Navarro
  • M. Pàmias
  • J. E. Obiols
Original Paper

Abstract

Performance of a group of 35 youth and adults with High-Functioning Autism (HFA) was compared with a typical developing (TD) group on three Advanced Theory of Mind tests. The distinction between the social-cognitive and social-perceptual components of Theory of Mind was also explored. The HFA group had more difficulties in all tasks. Performance on the two social-cognitive tests was highly correlated in the HFA group, but these were not related with the social-perceptual component. These results suggest that the youth with HFA have difficulties on all the components of social knowledge but may be using different underlying cognitive abilities depending on the nature of the task.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Asperger syndrome High functioning autism Advanced theory of mind Componential view 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Pedreño
    • 1
  • E. Pousa
    • 3
    • 4
    • 5
  • J. B. Navarro
    • 2
  • M. Pàmias
    • 3
  • J. E. Obiols
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Clinical and Health Psychology, Psychopathology and Neuropsychology Research UnitUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  2. 2.Department of Psychobiology and Methodology of Health SciencesUniversitat Autònoma de BarcelonaBarcelonaSpain
  3. 3.Department of Mental HealthCorporació Sanitària Parc Taulí de SabadellBarcelonaSpain
  4. 4.Institut de Neuropsiquiatria i AddiccionsHospital del MarBarcelonaSpain
  5. 5.IMIM (Hospital del Mar Medical Research Institute)BarcelonaSpain

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