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Brief Report: Non-right-Handedness Within the Autism Spectrum Disorder

Abstract

A larger distribution of left-handedness in the population of Autism Spectrum Disorder has been repeatedly reported. Despite of this, the sample sizes in the individual study’s are too small for any generalization to be made. Using both description-based and citation-based searches, the present review combines the individual results in order to examine whether non-right-handedness is a general trait of the autism spectrum disorder. With a relatively large combined sample size (N = 497), it can be concluded that the distribution of non-right-handedness is significantly greater within the autism spectrum disorder population, compared with the population in general.

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Acknowledgments

This study did not recieve any grants or other financial support.

Author Contributions

Both authors conceived the idea and designed the study together. ALR conducted the searches but AVP partook in the process of selecting studies for inclusion. Both authors in co-operation performed the data analysis, and they wrote the manuscript together. Both authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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Correspondence to Anne Langseth Rysstad.

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Rysstad, A.L., Pedersen, A.V. Brief Report: Non-right-Handedness Within the Autism Spectrum Disorder. J Autism Dev Disord 46, 1110–1117 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2631-2

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Keywords

  • Autism
  • Autism spectrum disorder
  • Non-right-handedness
  • Left-handedness
  • Handedness
  • Lateralization