Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 45, Issue 8, pp 2443–2463

Social Function and Communication in Optimal Outcome Children and Adolescents with an Autism History on Structured Test Measures

  • Alyssa J. Orinstein
  • Joyce Suh
  • Kaitlyn Porter
  • Kaitlin A. De Yoe
  • Katherine E. Tyson
  • Eva Troyb
  • Marianne L. Barton
  • Inge-Marie Eigsti
  • Michael C. Stevens
  • Deborah A. Fein
Original Paper

Abstract

Youth who lose their ASD diagnosis may have subtle social and communication difficulties. We examined social and communication functioning in 44 high-functioning autism (HFA), 34 optimal outcome (OO) and 34 typically developing (TD) youth. Results indicated that OO participants had no autism communication symptoms, no pragmatic language deficits, and were judged as likable as TD peers. Some group differences were found: OO youth had less insight into social relationships and poorer friendship descriptions than TD youth. OO participants had attention, self-control, and immaturity difficulties that may impact social abilities. However, OO participants were most engaged, friendliest, warmest, and most approachable. Overall, OO participants had no social and communicative impairments, although some exhibited mild social difficulties that often accompany attentional problems.

Keywords

Autism spectrum disorder Outcome Optimal outcomes Social Communication 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alyssa J. Orinstein
    • 1
  • Joyce Suh
    • 1
  • Kaitlyn Porter
    • 1
  • Kaitlin A. De Yoe
    • 1
  • Katherine E. Tyson
    • 1
  • Eva Troyb
    • 1
  • Marianne L. Barton
    • 1
  • Inge-Marie Eigsti
    • 1
  • Michael C. Stevens
    • 2
    • 3
  • Deborah A. Fein
    • 1
  1. 1.Unit 1020, Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Olin Neuropsychiatry Research Center, Institute of LivingHartford HospitalHartfordUSA
  3. 3.Yale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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