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Objectively Measured Physical Activity Between Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Children Without Disabilities During Inclusive Recess Settings in Taiwan

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the percent time children with and without autism spectrum disorders (ASD) spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) during inclusive recess settings. Forty-eight children (ASD, 23 boys and 1 girl; Non-ASD, 23 boys and 1 girl) aged 7–12 years from 14 schools had their physical activity during recess quantified using a uniaxial accelerometer over a 5-day in school period. Children with ASD were less active during overall recess, lunchtime, first and second morning recess compared to those without disabilities (p < .01). All children in this study did not achieve 40% of recess time in physical activity, suggesting that interventions for increasing physical activity of children during inclusive recess settings are warranted.

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Acknowledgments

This research was supported by grant NSC 94-2614-H-017-001, National Science Council, Taiwan. The author would like to express her gratitude to all children who participated in this study, parents of children for their support and all research assistants in data collection.

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Correspondence to Chien-Yu Pan.

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Pan, CY. Objectively Measured Physical Activity Between Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders and Children Without Disabilities During Inclusive Recess Settings in Taiwan. J Autism Dev Disord 38, 1292–1301 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-007-0518-6

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-007-0518-6

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