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Enhancing the Conversation Skills of a Boy with Asperger’s Disorder through Social Stories™ and Video Modeling

Abstract

This study combined Social Stories with video modeling in an effort to enhance the conversation skills of a boy with Asperger’s Disorder. Treatment consisted of two components: (a) observation of video taped Social Stories that included two adults modeling targeted conversational skills and (b) 5-min social interactions. A multiple baseline design across behaviors was used to evaluate the intervention and an increase in 2 out of 3 targeted conversation skills occurred. In addition, generalized behavior changes were observed. These findings provide support for including Social Stories as part of a video treatment package in teaching complex social interaction behaviors to young children with Asperger’s Disorder.

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Correspondence to Dorothy Scattone.

Appendix

Appendix

Social Stories for Eye Contact, Smiling, & Initiations

Looking and Talking

When I come to the clinic, I see lots of people. Some are nurses. Some are doctors. Some are kids! Usually someone talk to me. When someone talks tome, I will try to look at part of their face. Most people like it when I look at their face. Looking at their face makes them feel good. This lets them know I’m listening. If I look at them when I am talking, they will like this a lot. They will think I’m a nice boy I will try to look at their face most of the time we are talking.

Comprehension Questions:

  1. 1.

    Who do I see at the clinic?

  2. 2.

    What should I try to do if someone talks to me?

  3. 3.

    Do most people like it when I look at them while we talk?

Smiling

I like coming to the clinic. Most of the time, the people at the clinic say “hello” and ask me how I’m doing. Sometimes someone will sit and talk with me. It could be Mary, Susie, Annie, Maria or it could be someone else. When someone talks to me, I will try to look at part of their face. This way they know I’m listening. I will also try to smile when I look at them. If I smile while I’m looking at their face, they will like this a lot. Smiling will make them feel good to be around me. It will let them know I’m listening and that I’m enjoying talking to them. I will try to look and smile wen someone is talking to me.

Comprehension Questions:

  1. 1.

    Who usually talks to me in the clinic?

  2. 2.

    What someone sits and talks with me in the clinic what should I do?

  3. 3.

    How do people feel when I smile at them while we talk?

Taking Turns Talking

When people in the clinic see me, they usually say, “Hi Matthew!” When we talk, I will try to look at part of their face and I will try to smile! They may say, “How are you Matthew?” or “How was school?” After someone asks me a question, I will try to answer them in ONLY 1 or 2 sentences. Then I will try to give them a TURN to talk! I will try to ask them a question about themselves. Or…I can say something nice to them! This is called taking turns asking questions. They may ask a question, then I ask a question, and we go back and forth each taking turns.

  • I can ask: “How are you?”

  • “What are you going to do this weekend?”

  • “Did you see any movies?”

  • “Do you have pets? What kind?”

  • I can also say nice things like:

  • “You look nice today!” or

  • “I really like your outfit” or

  • “I really enjoy talking with you!”

If I look at the other person, smile, and ask how THEY are or I say nice things, this will let them know I like them! They will want to be my friend!

Comprehension Questions:

  1. 1.

    After someone asks me a question, what should I do?

  2. 2.

    What can I ask other people?

  3. 3.

    What nice can I say to other people?

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Scattone, D. Enhancing the Conversation Skills of a Boy with Asperger’s Disorder through Social Stories™ and Video Modeling. J Autism Dev Disord 38, 395–400 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-007-0392-2

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-007-0392-2

Keywords

  • Asperger’s Disorder
  • Social stories
  • Social interactions
  • Video modeling