Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 37, Issue 10, pp 1842–1857 | Cite as

Treating Anxiety Disorders in Children with High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Controlled Trial

Original paper

Abstract

A family-based, cognitive behavioural treatment for anxiety in 47 children with comorbid anxiety disorders and High Functioning Autism Spectrum Disorder (HFA) was evaluated. Treatment involved 12 weekly group sessions and was compared with a waiting list condition. Changes between pre- and post-treatment were examined using clinical interviews as well as child-, parent- and teacher-report measures. Following treatment, 71.4% of the treated participants no longer fulfilled diagnostic criteria for an anxiety disorder. Comparisons between the two conditions indicated significant reductions in anxiety symptoms as measured by self-report, parent report and teacher report. Discussion focuses on the implications for the use of cognitive behaviour therapy with HFA children, for theory of mind research and for further research on the treatment components.

Keywords

Autism Spectrum Disorder Anxiety Treatment 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anne Marie Chalfant
    • 1
  • Ron Rapee
    • 2
  • Louisa Carroll
    • 3
  1. 1.Annie’s CentreRandwickAustralia
  2. 2.Macquarie UniversityNorth RydeAustralia
  3. 3.Children’s Hospital at WestmeadSydneyAustralia

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