Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders

, Volume 37, Issue 7, pp 1361–1374 | Cite as

Follow-up of Children Diagnosed with Pervasive Developmental Disorders: Stability and Change During the Preschool Years

  • Sigrídur Lóa Jónsdóttir
  • Evald Saemundsen
  • Gudlaug Ásmundsdóttir
  • Sigrún Hjartardóttir
  • Bryndís B. Ásgeirsdóttir
  • Hrafnhildur H. Smáradóttir
  • Solveig Sigurdardóttir
  • Jakob Smári
Original Paper

Abstract

Forty-one children with pervasive developmental disorders (PDDs) receiving eclectic services were assessed twice during their preschool years. Measures were compared over time for the whole group and for diagnostic subgroups: Childhood autism (CA group) and Other PDDs group. The mean intelligence quotient/developmental quotient (IQ/DQ) of the whole group was stable (P = 0.209) and scores on the Childhood Autism Rating Scale (CARS) decreased (P = 0.001). At time 2, the CA group was more impaired than the other PDDs group: autistic symptoms were more severe (P = 0.01), adaptive behavior scores were lower (P = 0.014), and a trend for lower IQ/DQs (P = 0.06). Children in this study seemed to fare better than reported in previous follow-up studies on children with autism.

Keywords

Autism Pervasive developmental disorders ICD-10 Preschool Stability Change 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sigrídur Lóa Jónsdóttir
    • 1
  • Evald Saemundsen
    • 1
  • Gudlaug Ásmundsdóttir
    • 2
  • Sigrún Hjartardóttir
    • 1
  • Bryndís B. Ásgeirsdóttir
    • 2
  • Hrafnhildur H. Smáradóttir
    • 2
  • Solveig Sigurdardóttir
    • 1
  • Jakob Smári
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Autism and Communication DisordersState Diagnostic and Counseling CenterKópavogurIceland
  2. 2.Department of Social SciencesUniversity of IcelandReykjavíkIceland
  3. 3.Center for Child Health ServicesReykjavík Health Care servicesReykjavíkIceland
  4. 4.Icelandic Center for Social Research and AnalysisReykjavík Health Care servicesReykjavíkIceland

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