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Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology

, Volume 46, Issue 2, pp 355–363 | Cite as

Trajectories of Suicidal Ideation among Adolescents Following Psychiatric Hospitalization

  • Jennifer C. Wolff
  • Stephanie Davis
  • Richard T. Liu
  • Christine B. Cha
  • Shayna M. Cheek
  • Bridget A. Nestor
  • Elisabeth A. Frazier
  • Maya Massing Schaffer
  • Anthony Spirito
Article

Abstract

Suicidal ideation (SI) is a common presenting problem for psychiatric hospitalizations in adolescents and often persists following discharge. This study examines whether distinct trajectories of SI could be delineated following hospitalization and the risk factors most strongly related to these trajectories. Adolescents (N = 104; 76 females; 28 males) were followed for 6 months after discharge from inpatient or partial hospitalization. Semi-parametric group modeling identified SI trajectory group membership. In all, 33.7% of adolescents fell in a Subclinical SI group, 43.3% in a Declining SI group, and 23.1% in a Chronic SI group. Multinomial logistic regression was utilized to examine baseline predictors of group membership. Emotion dysregulation differentiated Chronic SI from Declining SI. In multivariate analyses, adolescents endorsing greater non-acceptance of emotional responses (OR =1.18) and more limited access to emotion regulation strategies (OR =1.12) were more likely to belong to the Chronic SI than Declining SI trajectory. Those in the Chronic SI group also had the greatest number of suicide attempts and hospitalizations in the 6 months post-discharge. These results suggest that clinicians should closely monitor and address emotion dysregulation when assessing suicide risk. Greater dysregulation may require more intensive services in order to have an effect on chronic SI.

Keywords

Chronic suicidal ideation Trajectories Emotion regulation 

Notes

Compliance with Ethical Standards

Funding

This study was funded by the National Institute of Mental Health (1R01MH099703-01).

Conflict of Interest

The authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical Approval

All procedures performed in studies involving human participants were in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional and/or national research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards. Ethical Approval: This article does not contain any studies with animals performed by any of the authors.

Informed Consent

Informed consent was obtained from all individual participants in the study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer C. Wolff
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • Stephanie Davis
    • 1
    • 2
  • Richard T. Liu
    • 1
    • 2
  • Christine B. Cha
    • 4
  • Shayna M. Cheek
    • 2
  • Bridget A. Nestor
    • 1
  • Elisabeth A. Frazier
    • 1
    • 2
  • Maya Massing Schaffer
    • 1
  • Anthony Spirito
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown UniversityProvidenceUSA
  2. 2.Bradley HospitalRiversideUSA
  3. 3.Rhode Island HospitalProvidenceUSA
  4. 4.Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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