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Spatial ability through engineering graphics education

Abstract

Spatial ability has been confirmed to be of particular importance for successful engineering graphics education and to be a component of human intelligence that can be improved through instruction and training. Consequently, the creation and communication by means of graphics demand careful development of spatial skills provided by the balanced curricula based on the research results in multi disciplinary area. The approach to engineering graphics education had been transformed to meet spatial skills improvement even before significant and fast changes arose from the development of computer technology enabling the engineer powerful tools and techniques. The correlation and interference between new technologies widely introduced in engineering graphics education and spatial ability/skills, have initiated new studies to establish the basis of holistic engineering graphics education. This paper presents the overview of some efforts and possible answers resulting from intensive research into spatial ability and skills and their implementation in the conception of graphics education in engineering environment.

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Correspondence to Gordana Marunic.

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Marunic, G., Glazar, V. Spatial ability through engineering graphics education. Int J Technol Des Educ 23, 703–715 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-012-9211-y

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Keywords

  • Spatial ability
  • Curriculum
  • Engineering graphics
  • Education