Enhancing teachers’ technological pedagogical knowledge and practices: a professional development model for technology teachers in Malawi

Abstract

This paper reports on a professional development that was designed and implemented in an attempt to broaden teachers’ knowledge of the nature of technology and also enhance their technological pedagogical practices. The professional development was organised in four phases with each phase providing themes for reflection and teacher learning in subsequent phases. On-going support, reflection and feedback underpinned the professional development processes to enhance teachers’ prospects of putting aside old traditions and culture to implement new practices in their classrooms. The teachers collaboratively explored new concepts through readings of selected scholarly papers, making presentations of their views generated from the readings and engaging with peers in discussing learning, curriculum issues and concepts related to the nature of technology and technology education. A qualitative analysis of the teachers’ journey through the phases of the professional development showed the teachers’ enhanced knowledge of technology and technology education. However, their classroom practices showed technological pedagogical techniques that reflected their traditional strategies for teaching technical subjects. It is argued that although the teachers’ conceptualisation of learning in technology was still fragile at this point, attempts to shift teachers’ beliefs and practices require deep theoretical grounding and transferring that into technological practices. A professional development built on existing ideas and context helps expand the teachers’ views about the nature of technology and technology education.

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Correspondence to Vanwyk Khobidi Mbubzi Chikasanda.

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Chikasanda, V.K.M., Otrel-Cass, K., Williams, J. et al. Enhancing teachers’ technological pedagogical knowledge and practices: a professional development model for technology teachers in Malawi. Int J Technol Des Educ 23, 597–622 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10798-012-9206-8

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Keywords

  • Professional development
  • Pedagogical knowledge
  • Technology education
  • Technological practices