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Investigating mobile wireless technology adoption: An extension of the technology acceptance model

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Abstract

This research represents a theoretical extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), which IS researchers have used to explain technologies’ perceived usefulness and individuals intention to use it. The authors developed a model, referred to as the Mobile Wireless Technology Acceptance Model (MWTAM), to test the relationship between theoretical constructs spanning technological influence processes (Perceived Ubiquity, and Perceived Reachability) and cognitive influence processes (Job Relevance, Perceived Usefulness, and Perceived Ease of Use) and their impact on Behavioral Intention. MWTAM is assessed using data collected from an online survey and analyzed using AMOS 5.0. Results provide evidence to support MWTAM as both the technological and cognitive influence processes accounted for 58.7% of the variance explained in an individual’s Behavioral Intention toward using mobile wireless technology. Additionally, the path coefficients between constructs ranged from 0.241 to 0.572 providing further evidence to support the theoretical extension of TAM.

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Correspondence to Sanghyun Kim.

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Table 9 Survey instrument

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Kim, S., Garrison, G. Investigating mobile wireless technology adoption: An extension of the technology acceptance model. Inf Syst Front 11, 323–333 (2009). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10796-008-9073-8

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