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International Ophthalmology

, Volume 38, Issue 1, pp 191–198 | Cite as

Intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment for subretinal neovascularisation secondary to type 2 idiopathic juxtafoveolar telangiectasia

  • Teresa Barth
  • Florian Zeman
  • Horst Helbig
  • Maria-Andreea Gamulescu
Original Paper
  • 119 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose

To assess the long-term outcome of patients with subretinal neovascular membrane (SRNVM) secondary to type 2 idiopathic juxtafoveolar telangiectasia (IJT) receiving intravitreal anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) injections.

Methods

A total of 14 eyes of 12 patients treated with intravitreal anti-VEGF for SRNVM related to type 2 IJT were retrospectively assessed.

Results

Nine men and 3 women with a mean age of 66 years (SD 12, range 47–87 years) were diagnosed with IJT-related SRNVM. On average, 6.8 injections (SD 5.5, range 3–18) were given per eye. Ten eyes were treated with ranibizumab, 3 eyes with bevacizumab and 1 eye received both substances. The median follow-up after the last injection was 31 months (IQR: 18, 48). In 6 eyes, BCVA improved by 1–4 lines (mean Δ +2.0 lines), 1 eye remained stable and 7 eyes showed decline of vision by 1–5 lines (mean Δ −2.1 lines). The baseline central foveal thickness was significantly reduced from a mean of 323 (SD 87) to 266 µm (SD 71 µm) at the last follow-up visit (p = 0.001).

Conclusions

SRNVM development is a severe complication of type 2 IJT. Since the establishment of intravitreal anti-VEGF treatment laser coagulation and PDT have lost significance. Intravitreal anti-VEGF therapy seems to be safe and effective for the treatment of IJT-related SRNVM. Frequently multiple intravitreal injections are necessary for stabilisation.

Keywords

Subretinal neovascular membrane Idiopathic juxtafoveolar telangiectasia Intravitreal antiangiogenic therapy Anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) 

Notes

Compliance with ethical standards

Conflict of interest

All authors declare that they have no conflict of interest.

Ethical standards

Data collection was conducted in accordance with the ethical standards of the institutional research committee and with the 1964 Helsinki Declaration and its later amendments or comparable ethical standards.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of OphthalmologyUniversity Medical Centre RegensburgRegensburgGermany
  2. 2.Centre for Clinical Studies (ZKS)University Medical Centre RegensburgRegensburgGermany

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