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Inflammopharmacology

, Volume 26, Issue 5, pp 1283–1292 | Cite as

Brazilian green propolis hydroalcoholic extract reduces colon damages caused by dextran sulfate sodium-induced colitis in mice

  • Luisa Nathália Bolda Mariano
  • Caroline Arruda
  • Lincon Bordignon Somensi
  • Ana Paula Michels Costa
  • Eduardo Gnoatto Perondi
  • Thaise Boeing
  • Marihá Mariott
  • Rita de Cássia Melo Vilhena de Andrade Fonseca da Silva
  • Priscila de Souza
  • Jairo Kenupp Bastos
  • Sérgio Faloni de Andrade
  • Luisa Mota da Silva
Short Communication
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Abstract

This study investigated the effects of Brazilian green propolis hydroalcoholic extract (BPE) in 3% w/v dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis in mice. The effects of BPE (3, 30 and 300 mg/kg, p.o, by 7 days) on the morphological (colon length and colon weight), clinical (disease activity index and weight loss), microscopic (histological score and mucin levels) and biochemical parameters were determined. The effects of BPE (300 mg/kg, p.o) in the gastrointestinal transit of mice were also evaluated. As expected, the DSS ingestion damaged the colonic tissue, lowered the body weight, decreased the mucin levels, increased MPO activity, reduced SOD activity and GSH amount. In contrast, the treatment with BPE (300 mg/kg) significantly reduced macroscopic colonic injury and the mucosal damage in colon on histopathological examination and reversed the decrease in mucin levels induced by DSS. It also significantly normalized the SOD activity and the levels of GSH, but did not elicit any effect on MPO activity in the colon. In addition, BPE did not change the gastric emptying or the intestinal transit rate of mice. Together, these results suggested that BPE reduced the signs of DSS-induced colitis in mice through maintenance of intestinal mucin barrier and favoring intestinal antioxidant defenses.

Keywords

Colitis DSS Brazilian green propolis 

Notes

Acknowledgements

The authors are thankful to the São Paulo Research Foundation for financial support, Grant number 2017/04138-8. In addition, we are grateful to Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior (CAPES) and Universidade do Vale do Itajaí (UNIVALI) for their financial support. Moreover, RCMVAFS is grateful for the postdoctoral scholarship from PNPD/CAPES.

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Copyright information

© Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature 2018

Authors and Affiliations

  • Luisa Nathália Bolda Mariano
    • 1
  • Caroline Arruda
    • 3
  • Lincon Bordignon Somensi
    • 1
  • Ana Paula Michels Costa
    • 2
  • Eduardo Gnoatto Perondi
    • 2
  • Thaise Boeing
    • 1
  • Marihá Mariott
    • 1
  • Rita de Cássia Melo Vilhena de Andrade Fonseca da Silva
    • 1
  • Priscila de Souza
    • 1
  • Jairo Kenupp Bastos
    • 3
  • Sérgio Faloni de Andrade
    • 1
  • Luisa Mota da Silva
    • 1
  1. 1.Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências Farmacêuticas, Núcleo de Investigações Químico-Farmacêuticas (NIQFAR)Universidade do Vale do Itajai (UNIVALI)ItajaíBrazil
  2. 2.Graduação em MedicinaUNIVALIItajaíBrazil
  3. 3.Programa de Pós Graduação em Ciências FarmacêuticasUniversidade de São Paulo (USP)São PauloBrazil

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