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Journal of Indian Philosophy

, Volume 44, Issue 1, pp 155–177 | Cite as

Is Viveka a Unique Pramāṇa in the Vivekacūḍāmaṇi?

  • Walter Menezes
Article

Abstract

This is an enquiry based on the Vivekacūḍāmaṇi (VC), the primary focus of which is to present viveka (discrimination) along with its three catalysts, namely, śruti, tarka, and anubhava as the unique pramāṇa of Ultimate Knowledge. This paper discusses the significance of the six popular pramāṇas of Advaita Vedānta (AV) and reiterates that as far as AV is concerned epistemologically those pramāṇas have merely a provisional value (vyāvahārika). In accordance with the purport of VC this paper argues that śruti and tarka, culminating in anubhava (trans-empirical insight sans experience) are blind in themselves and are enthusiastically carried forward by viveka (discrimination) for the attainment of the final realisation. This paper concludes that viveka, along with its three catalysts namely, śruti, tarka, and anubhava is the sole pramāṇa of the trans-empirical experiential knowledge of Brahman.

Keywords

Pramā Pramāṇa Śruti Tarka Anubhava Viveka Brahmādvitīyaḥ 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Dordrecht 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Humanities & Social SciencesIndian Institute of Technology BombayMumbaiIndia

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