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Measuring change in career counseling: Validation of the Career Futures Inventory-Revised

Abstract

This retrospective chart review study examined the factor structure of the Career Futures Inventory-Revised (CFI-R; Rottinghaus et al. in J Career Assess 20:123–139, 2012) and its utility as a career counseling outcome measure using a sample of 332 clients from a university career center. The CFI-R examines career agency and other career adaptability dimensions germane to clients’ career concerns. Confirmatory factor analysis results supported the proposed factor structure. Changes in CFI-R scale scores are reported for 116 clients who received counseling. The use of the CFI-R as an effectiveness outcome measure for individual, group, and classroom career interventions is addressed.

Résumé

Mesurer le changement dans le conseil en orientation: Validation de l’ Inventaire Révisé des Futurs Professionnels. Ce dossier rétrospectif présente l’étude qui a examiné la structure factorielle de l’Inventaire Révisé des Futurs Professionnels (CFI-R; Rottinghaus, Buelow, Matyja, & Schneider, 2012) et son utilité en tant que mesure du résultat du conseil en orientation sur un échantillon de 332 clients issus d’un centre de conseil en orientation universitaire. Le CFI-R examine l’agentivité de carrière et les autres dimensions de l’adaptabilité de carrière relatives aux préoccupations de carrière. Les résultats de l’analyse factorielle confirmatoire soutiennent la structure factorielle proposée. Des changements dans les scores de l’échelle CFI-R sont reportés pour 116 clients ayant bénéficié d’un conseil en orientation. L’utilisation du CFI-R en tant que mesure de l’efficacité pour les interventions de carrières individuelles, de groupe et en classe, est discutée.

Zusammenfassung

Veränderungsmessung in der Berufsberatung: Validierung des Career Futures Inventory - Revised. Diese retrospektive Studie untersucht die Faktorenstruktur des Career Futures Inventory-Revised (CFI-R; Rottinghaus, Buelow, Matyja, & Schneider, 2012) und dessen effektiven Nutzen bei der Berufsberatung anhand einer Stichprobe von 332 Klienten eines Hochschulkarrierecenters. Das CFI-R untersucht Handlungsmacht und andere Dimensionen der beruflichen Anpassungsfähigkeit entsprechend den Anliegen der Klienten. Resultate der konfirmatorischen Faktorenanalyse stützen die vorgeschlagene Faktorenstruktur. Änderungen der CFI-R Skalenwerte werden für 116 Klienten berichtet, welche eine Berufsberatung erhalten haben. Den Nutzen des CFI-R, um die Effektivität der Ergebnisse für Individuen, Gruppen und Klassen zu bestimmen, wird thematisiert.

Resumen

Medir el cambio en orientación profesional: Validación del Career Futures Inventory - Revised. Este estudio de revisión retrospectiva gráfica examinó la estructura factorial del Career Futures Inventory-Revised (TPI-R; Rottinghaus, Buelow, Matyja, y Schneider, 2012) y su utilidad como medida de resultados de la orientación profesional utilizando una muestra de 332 clientes de un centro universitario de formación profesional. El TPI-R examina la preferencia profesional y otras dimensiones de adaptabilidad relacionadas con las preocupaciones profesionales de los clientes. Los resultados del análisis factorial confirmatorio apoyaron la estructura factorial propuesta. Los cambios en las puntuaciones de la escala TPI-R son reportados por 116 clientes que recibieron asesoramiento. El uso de la CFI-R como un instrumento eficaz de medida de los resultados de las intervenciones profesionales está indicado a nivel individual, de grupo y de clase.

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Correspondence to Patrick J. Rottinghaus.

Appendix

Appendix

Career Futures Inventory-Revised

This questionnaire assesses critical factors for people considering career transitions. You will be asked a series of questions regarding your current thoughts and feelings about how you plan your career. Please answer the following items as honestly as you can. There are no right or wrong answers. Read each statement carefully, then use the following scale to indicate how strongly you agree or disagree with each statement:

1 = Strongly Disagree, 2 = Disagree, 3 = Neutral, 4 = Agree, 5 = Strongly Agree

  1. ——1.

    I can perform a successful job search.

  2. ——2.

    I doubt my career will turn out well in the future.

  3. ——3.

    I can establish a plan for my future career.

  4. ——4.

    Others in my life are very supportive of my career.

  5. ——5.

    I understand how economic trends affect career opportunities available to me.

  6. ——6.

    I am aware of priorities in my life.

  7. ——7.

    I am good at understanding job market trends.

  8. ——8.

    Thinking about my career frustrates me.

  9. ——9.

    I can easily manage my needs and those of other important people in my life.

  10. ——10.

    I can overcome potential barriers that may exist in my career.

  11. ——11.

    I lack the energy to pursue my career goals.

  12. ——12.

    Balancing work and family responsibilities is manageable.

  13. ——13.

    My family is there to help me through career challenges.

  14. ——14.

    I can adapt to change in the world of work.

  15. ——15.

    I do not understand job market trends.

  16. ——16.

    I am aware of my strengths.

  17. ——17.

    I keep up with trends in at least one occupation or industry of interest to me.

  18. ——18.

    I receive encouragement from others to meet my career goals.

  19. ——19.

    I understand my work-related interests.

  20. ——20.

    I am very strategic when it comes to balancing my work and personal lives.

  21. ——21.

    I keep current with job market trends.

  22. ——22.

    I understand my work-related values.

  23. ——23.

    Friends are available to offer support in my career transition.

  24. ——24.

    I am good at balancing multiple life roles such as worker, family member, or friend.

  25. ——25.

    It is unlikely that good things will happen in my career.

  26. ——26.

    I will successfully manage my present career transition process.

  27. ——27.

    I keep current with changes in technology.

  28. ——28.

    I am in control of my career.

Scoring Key::

Career Agency: 1, 3, 6, 10, 14, 16, 19, 22, 26, 28.

Occupational Awareness: 5, 7, 15(RS), 17, 21, 27.

Negative Career Outlook: 2, 8, 11, 25.

Support: 4, 13, 18, 23.

Work–Life Balance: 9, 12, 20, 24.

RS : Item #15 is reverse-scored: (1 = 5; 2 = 4; 3 = 3; 4 = 2; 5 = 1).

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Rottinghaus, P.J., Eshelman, A., Gore, J.S. et al. Measuring change in career counseling: Validation of the Career Futures Inventory-Revised . Int J Educ Vocat Guidance 17, 61–75 (2017). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10775-016-9329-7

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Keywords

  • Adaptability
  • Maturity
  • Assessment