Advertisement

Effect of Handling, Packing and Transportation on the Moisture of Timber Wood

  • Zuzana PálkováEmail author
  • Martina Rudolfová
  • Eric Georgin
  • Mohamed W. Ben Ayoub
  • Vito Fernicola
  • Giulio Beltramino
  • Nabila Ismail
  • Doaa abd El Gelil
  • Byung Il Choi
  • Martti Heinonen
TEMPMEKO 2016
Part of the following topical collections:
  1. TEMPMEKO 2016: Selected Papers of the 13th International Symposium on Temperature, Humidity, Moisture and Thermal Measurements in Industry and Science

Abstract

In order to improve the efficiency of moisture meters calibrations, we studied the effect of ambient humidity, sample handling, packing and transportation on the timber wood (spruce) moisture determination. It was proved by experiments that dry timber samples (\(12 \times 12 \times 2.5\) cm) reach equilibrium within 30–40 days even when moisturizing them at a high relative air humidity (80 %). On the other hand, the major mass loss of moist samples placed at normal laboratory conditions was found to occur during the first few days while the first 5 days are critical. The effects of sample handling, packing and transportation were studied by means of interlaboratory comparison between CMI, CETIAT, INRIM, NIS and KRISS. The obtained results show that samples with moisture content less than 7 % tend to absorb small amount of water, whereas samples with moisture content larger than 15 % tend to desorb small amount of water during the handling and transporting even when using vacuum packing and short handling times.

Keywords

Effect of ambient humidity Moisture content Timber wood Transportation Wood handling 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This work was supported by EMRP/EU project SIB64—METefnet which is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and the European Union and by internal project of Czech Metrology Institute No. TR 15501101.

References

  1. 1.
    S.V. Glass, S.L. Zelinka, in Wood Handbook—Wood as an Engineering Material, ed. by R.J. Ross (Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, 2010), pp. 4-1–4-5Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    J.F. Siau, Transport Processes in Wood (Springer, Berlin, 1984)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    A.R. Urquhart, J. Text. Inst. 20, T125 (1929)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    S.E. Smith, J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 646 (1947)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    H.J. White, H. Eyring, Text. Res. J. 17, 523 (1947)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Forest Product Laboratory, in Wood Handbook—Wood as an Engineering Material, General Technical Report FPL-GTR-190 (Forest Products Laboratory, Madison, 2010)Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    P. Dietsch, B. Franke, A. Gamper, S. Winter, J. Civ. Struct. Health Monit. 5, 115 (2015)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    L. Greenspan, J. Res. NBS A Phys. Chem. 81A, 89 (1977)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    M. Rudolfová, L. Netolická Pitrová, Z. Ferenčíková, T. Váchová, R. Strnad, in CIM Conference, Paris, Sept (2015)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2017

Authors and Affiliations

  • Zuzana Pálková
    • 1
    Email author
  • Martina Rudolfová
    • 1
  • Eric Georgin
    • 2
  • Mohamed W. Ben Ayoub
    • 2
  • Vito Fernicola
    • 3
  • Giulio Beltramino
    • 3
  • Nabila Ismail
    • 4
  • Doaa abd El Gelil
    • 4
  • Byung Il Choi
    • 5
  • Martti Heinonen
    • 6
  1. 1.Czech Metrology Institute (CMI)BrnoCzech Republic
  2. 2.Centre Techniquie des Industries Aérauliques et Thermiques (CETIAT)LyonFrance
  3. 3.Instituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRIM)TurinItaly
  4. 4.National Institute of Standards (NIS)GizaEgypt
  5. 5.Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science (KRISS)DaejeongKorea
  6. 6.Centre for Metrology MIKESVTT Technical Research Centre of Finland LtdEspooFinland

Personalised recommendations