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International Journal of Thermophysics

, Volume 36, Issue 8, pp 1895–1908 | Cite as

A Self-Validation Method for High-Temperature Thermocouples Under Oxidizing Atmospheres

  • S. MokdadEmail author
  • G. Failleau
  • T. Deuzé
  • S. Briaudeau
  • O. Kozlova
  • M. Sadli
Article
  • 222 Downloads

Abstract

Thermocouples are prone to significant drift in use particularly when they are exposed to high temperatures. Indeed, high-temperature exposure can affect the response of a thermocouple progressively by changing the structure of the thermoelements and inducing inhomogeneities. Moreover, an oxidizing atmosphere contributes to thermocouple drift by changing the chemical nature of the metallic wires by the effect of oxidation. In general, severe uncontrolled drift of thermocouples results from these combined influences. A periodic recalibration of the thermocouple can be performed, but sometimes it is not possible to remove the sensor out of the process. Self-validation methods for thermocouples provide a solution to avoid this drawback, but there are currently no high-temperature contact thermometers with self-validation capability at temperatures up to \(1600\,^{\circ }\hbox {C}\). LNE-Cnam has developed fixed-point devices integrated to the thermocouples consisting of machined alumina-based devices for operation under oxidizing atmospheres. These devices require small amounts of pure metals (typically less than 2 g). They are suitable for self-validation of high-temperature thermocouples up to \(1600\,^{\circ }\hbox {C}\). In this paper the construction and the characterization of these integrated fixed-point devices are described. The phase-transition plateaus of gold, nickel, and palladium, which enable coverage of the temperature range between \(1000\,^{\circ }\hbox {C}\) and \(1600\,^{\circ }\hbox {C}\), are assessed with this self-validation technique. Results of measurements performed at LNE-Cnam with the integrated self-validation module at several levels of temperature will be presented. The performance of the devices are assessed and discussed, in terms of robustness and metrological characteristics. Uncertainty budgets are also proposed and detailed.

Keywords

Alumina Fixed point Oxidizing atmospheres  Self-validation methods Thermocouples 

Notes

Acknowledgments

This work is in part funded by the European Metrology Research Programme (EMRP) in the framework of the HiTeMS project. The EMRP is jointly funded by the EMRP participating countries within EURAMET and “the European Union.”

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Mokdad
    • 1
    Email author
  • G. Failleau
    • 1
  • T. Deuzé
    • 1
  • S. Briaudeau
    • 1
  • O. Kozlova
    • 1
  • M. Sadli
    • 1
  1. 1.Laboratoire Commun de Métrologie LNE-CnamSaint-DenisFrance

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