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International Journal of Thermophysics

, Volume 28, Issue 3, pp 1056–1066 | Cite as

Investigation of Deposit Formation Mechanisms for Engine In-cylinder Combustion and Exhaust Systems Using Quantitative Analysis and Sustainability Study

  • Z. Ye
  • Q. Meng
  • H. P. Mohamadian
  • J. T. Wang
  • L. Chen
  • L. Zhu
Article

Abstract

The formation of SI engine combustion deposits is a complex phenomenon which depends on various factors of fuel, oil, additives, and engine. The goal of this study is to examine the effects of operating conditions, gasoline, lubricating oil, and additives on deposit formation. Both an experimental investigation and theoretical analysis are conducted on a single cylinder engine. As a result, the impact of deposits on engine performance and exhaust emissions (HC, NO x ) has been indicated. Using samples from a cylinder head and exhaust pipe as well as switching gases via the dual-gas method (N2, O2), the deposit formation mechanism is thoroughly investigated via the thermogravity analysis approach, where the roles of organic, inorganic, and volatile components of fuel, additives, and oil on deposit formation are identified from thermogravity curves. Sustainable feedback control design is then proposed for potential emission control and performance optimization

Keywords

Engine deposits Quantitative analysis Sustainability Thermal gravity curve 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007

Authors and Affiliations

  • Z. Ye
    • 1
  • Q. Meng
    • 2
  • H. P. Mohamadian
    • 1
  • J. T. Wang
    • 3
  • L. Chen
    • 4
  • L. Zhu
    • 4
  1. 1.College of EngineeringSouthern UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  2. 2.Litens Automotive GroupTorontoCanada
  3. 3.Department of PhysicsSouthern UniversityBaton RougeUSA
  4. 4.National Key Laboratory of EnginesTianjin UniversityTianjinChina

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