International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 30, Issue 4, pp 533–551 | Cite as

A New Subspecies of Saguinus fuscicollis (Primates, Callitrichidae)

  • Fabio Röhe
  • José de Sousa e SilvaJr
  • Ricardo Sampaio
  • Anthony B. Rylands
Article

Abstract

Saddleback tamarins (Saguinus fuscicollis, S. melanoleucus, and S. tripartitus) occur in the upper Amazon, west of the rios Madeira and Mamoré–Guaporé to the Andes. They currently comprise 13 species and subspecies in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Here we report on a previously undescribed subspecies of Saguinus fuscicollis from the interfluvium of the lower rios Madeira and Purus in the central Amazon of Brazil. It is a distinct form with a very pronounced mottling on the back giving the appearance of a saddle, a characteristic shared by the 3 species, and the reason for their collective common name. The lack of a white superciliary chevron and its highly mottled ochraceous-dark brown to black saddle that extends from the scapular region to the base of the tail distinguish the new taxon from Saguinus fuscicollis weddelli. The latter characteristic also distinguishes it from another saddleback tamarin (Saguinus fuscicollis ssp.) that has been reported immediately to the south of its range in the same interfluvium. We compare pelage coloration, external characters and craniometric measurements with its geographically closest relatives, Saguinus fuscicollis weddelli and S. f. avilapiresi, and indicate its probable geographic distribution in a small area between the rios Madeira and Purus, just south of the Rio Amazonas.

Keywords

Callitrichidae Central Amazon geographic distribution Primates Saguinus fuscicollis ssp. n. 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Fabio Röhe
    • 1
    • 2
    • 3
  • José de Sousa e SilvaJr
    • 4
  • Ricardo Sampaio
    • 2
  • Anthony B. Rylands
    • 5
  1. 1.Wildlife Conservation SocietyAmazonasBrazil
  2. 2.Departamento de EcologiaInstituto Nacional de Pesquisas da AmazôniaManausBrazil
  3. 3.Departamento de Biologia, Instituto de Ciências BiológicasUniversidade Federal do AmazonasManausBrazil
  4. 4.Coordenação de ZoologiaMuseu Paraense Emílio GoeldiBelémBrazil
  5. 5.Center for Applied Biodiversity ScienceConservation InternationalArlingtonUSA

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