International Journal of Primatology

, Volume 29, Issue 4, pp 865–884 | Cite as

A Comparison of Female Mating Strategies in Pan troglodytes and Pongo spp.

Article

Abstract

Orangutans and chimpanzees differ in many aspects of their mating and social systems. Nevertheless, because both great apes require enormous maternal investment in offspring and because female reproductive potential is limited, female orangutans and chimpanzees should be selective of their mates, yet expected to exhibit anti-infanticide strategies such as mating with multiple males. We review and compare mating patterns in orangutans and chimpanzees to understand how these critical pressures are filtered through the different demands of the socioecology of each species. We highlight the variation in female mating behavior as a function of the proximity of ovulation. We conclude that both genera pursue tactics for paternity confusion by mating with multiple males and by mating cooperatively or even proceptively with nonpreferred partners when conception is unlikely. Mating selectivity is suggested by variation in proceptive behavior toward particular partners and by increased resistance of nonpreferred partners during the periovulatory period. Thus, data for both species support a mixed mating strategy whereby females shift their mating behavior in accordance with ovulatory status to accommodate the competing demands of mate selectivity and paternity confusion.

Keywords

Chimpanzees orangutans reproductive strategies female mate choice 

Notes

Acknowledgments

R. M. Stumpf thanks J. D. Polk, C. Boesch, the Taï Chimpanzee Project, the Centre Suisse de la Recherche Scientifique, the Ministèěre de la Recherche Scientifique in Côte d’Ivoire, the Ministèěre de l’Agriculture et des Resources Animales, Côte d’Ivoire and the direction of Taï National Park. R.M. Stumpf acknowledges support from the National Science Foundation, the Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science, and the University of Illinois. C. D. Knott thanks the Directorate of Nature Conservation (PHKA), the Indonesian Institute of Sciences (LIPI), the Center for Research and Development in Biology (PPPB), and the many field assistants and project managers at Gunung Palung National Park. Lydia Beaudrot assisted in final preparation of the manuscript. C. D. Knott acknowledges support from the National Geographic Society, the Leakey Foundation, the Conservation, Food and Health Foundation, the Orangutan Conservancy, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the National Science Foundation, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and Harvard University.

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Copyright information

© U.S. Government 2008

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. M. Stumpf
    • 1
  • M. Emery Thompson
    • 3
  • C. D. Knott
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignUrbanaUSA
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologyHarvard UniversityCambridgeUSA
  3. 3.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerqueUSA

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