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MATHEMATICS EDUCATION VALUES QUESTIONNAIRE FOR TURKISH PRESERVICE MATHEMATICS TEACHERS: DESIGN, VALIDATION, AND RESULTS

  • Yüksel DedeEmail author
Article

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to develop a questionnaire that could measure preservice mathematics teachers' mathematics educational values. Development and validation of the questionnaire involved a sequential inquiry in which design principles were established from the existing literature and a pool of items was constructed then submitted to experts for consideration of the construct validity. Alterations to the items based on their suggestions were made to produce a trial version of the questionnaire. A pilot study involving preservice mathematics teachers explored the validity and usefulness of the questionnaire. The pilot results were used to revise the questionnaire that was administered to a sample of preservice mathematics teachers attending Cumhuriyet University, Sivas, Turkey. Further explorations of the construct and structural validity, item contributions, and reliability were achieved by using a factor analysis and two different item analysis methods. Results revealed that the questionnaire included four factors, satisfactory item contributions, and acceptable internal consistency. One result obtained in this study suggested that some mathematics education values based on Western culture (e.g., accessibility–special) have not been accepted by Turkish preservice mathematics teachers.

Key words

mathematics educational values preservice mathematics teachers questionnaire reliability Turkey validity values 

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Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Educational Science and PsychologyFree University of BerlinBerlinGermany

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