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DEVELOPMENT, VALIDATION, AND USE OF A GREEK-LANGUAGE QUESTIONNAIRE FOR ASSESSING LEARNING ENVIRONMENTS IN GRADE 10 CHEMISTRY CLASSES

  • Maria Giallousi
  • Vassilios Gialamas
  • Nicolas Spyrellis
  • Evangelia A. PavlatouEmail author
Research

ABSTRACT

This study describes the development and validation of a Greek-language instrument that can be used to assess grade 10 students' perceptions of their chemistry classroom environment as a means of showing differences between chemistry learning environments in Greece (Attica) and Cyprus. The development of the instrument was based on available learning environment questionnaires. The questionnaire was administered to 1,394 students from 49 chemistry classes in Attica, and the resulting data were analyzed to explore the reliability and the validity of the new instrument. The validated questionnaire was administered to 225 students from 15 classes in urban areas of Cyprus. The data analyses supported the questionnaire's internal consistency, discriminant validity, and ability to differentiate between classrooms. Effect sizes and independent samples t test analyses revealed differences between the two samples. Cypriot students viewed their chemistry classroom environment more favorably than did the Attica students. A possible cause for this difference could be the knowledge-centered aspect of the grade 10 chemistry curriculum in Greece compared to the corresponding tool-instrumental knowledge curriculum in Cyprus.

KEY WORDS

chemistry education learning environment high school cross-validation comparative study 

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Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2009

Authors and Affiliations

  • Maria Giallousi
    • 1
  • Vassilios Gialamas
    • 2
  • Nicolas Spyrellis
    • 1
  • Evangelia A. Pavlatou
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.General Chemistry Laboratory, School of Chemical EngineeringNational Technical University of AthensAthensGreece
  2. 2.Department of Early Childhood EducationUniversity of AthensAthensGreece

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