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Conceptualizing teachers' understanding of students' mathematical learning by using assessment tasks*

  • Pi-Jen LinEmail author
Article

Abstract

The study was designed to support teachers on conceptualizing their understanding of students' learning by the use of assessment tasks. A school-based assessment team consisting of the researcher and four third-grade teachers teaching in the same school was set up as a learning context of supporting teachers in developing assessment tasks integral to instruction. The assessment tasks along with students' responses to the task, classroom observations, interviews, routine weekly meetings, teachers' weekly reflective journals, and students' responses to the assessment tasks were the data collected in the study. The teachers' views of using assessment tasks and the generation of assessment tasks were developed in the course of the study. In the process of generating assessment tasks, teachers improved their awareness of students' various solutions and learning difficulties to a specific problem, their awareness of the importance of developing students' critical thinking, and their awareness of where students need to make a remedial instruction.

Key words

assessment tasks professional development students' responses 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, Inc. 2006

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mathematics EducationNational HsinChu University of EducationHsin-ChuPeople’s Republic of China

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