Enhancing Technology Education by Forming Links with Industry: A New Zealand Case Study

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Article

Abstract

The New Zealand technology curriculum suggests that schools should seek to develop links with industry as a means of providing real-world examples of technology practice. However, if a school is to form links, what form might such links take, and with whom should they be made? The case study research reported here represents an investigation into the perceptions different New Zealand education stakeholders have toward the development of a link between a rural school in a low socioeconomic setting, with a local biotechnology organization. The study found support for the link across all stakeholder groups, but the research findings suggest that addressing cultural issues, especially those of Māori (indigenous New Zealanders), is important. Other factors such as a lack of knowledge and understanding amongst teachers about biotechnology in general and emerging biotechnology industries in particular were identified as potential inhibiting factors. The results suggest that a long-term relationship is desirable, and that open and regular communication between stakeholder groups is essential in the establishment of school-industry links.

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Copyright information

© National Science Council, Taiwan 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Centre for Science and Technology Education ResearchUniversity of WaikatoHamiltonNew Zealand

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