“A Cluster of Sacred Symbols”: Interpreting an Act of Animal Sacrifice at Kingsley Plantation, Fort George Island, Florida (1814–39)

Article

Abstract

Archaeologists often attempt to link artifacts recovered from enslaved plantation contexts to African-derived spiritual belief systems. Recent excavations within the slave cabins of Kingsley Plantation have revealed many artifacts that potentially held religious significance for the first-generation enslaved Africans who lived there between 1814 and 1839, the most significant of which was an intact chicken sacrifice buried in a slave cabin floor. The types of spiritual acts that involve animal sacrifice within several historic and modern cultures of West and Central Africa are documented and critically evaluated, and an interpretation is given regarding the example from Kingsley Plantation within its New World context.

Keywords

Enslavement Afro-Spanish and African-American Animal Sacrifice African Religions Ethnohistory 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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