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The Shifting Tides of Empires: Using GIS to Contextualize Population Change Within the Landscape of Seventeenth to Nineteenth-Century Mani, Greece

  • Rebecca M. Seifried
Article

Abstract

This study investigates the changing social landscape of the Mani Peninsula, Greece, from 1618 to 1829. Five primary sources of population data are combined in a GIS database, and spatial analyses are used to track patterns in population and settlement distribution. The results show that the preparations for war in Mani led to population loss, settlement fracturing, and a heightened potential for physical and visual connection. The processes of imperial conquest and resistance left a different imprint upon the Maniate landscape than in other parts of the Ottoman Empire, where settlements were occasionally relocated into more mountainous terrain for increased protection.

Keywords

GIS Spatial analysis Population records Ottoman empire Greece 

Notes

Acknowledgments

A version of this paper was presented at the 114th Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America in Seattle, WA, in January 2013. Research was funded through grants from the University of Illinois at Chicago Chancellor’s Graduate Research Fellowship, The Field Museum Anthropology Alliance Internship, and the National Science Foundation International Research Experience for Students. None of this work would have been possible without the help of Dani Riebe, Billy Ridge, Jay Greaves, Andonis Koilakos, Drs. Wayne Lee and Apostolos Sarris, and the directors of The Diros Project, Drs. Giorgos Papathanassopoulos, Anastasia Papathanasiou, Bill Parkinson, and Mike Galaty. I am also grateful to the reviewers of the International Journal of Historical Archaeology, whose comments have undoubtedly strengthened this paper.

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Anthropology (MC 027)University of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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