Vertebrate Use at Early Colonies on the Southeastern Coasts of Eastern North America

Article

Abstract

Data from early European-sponsored colonies on the coasts of the Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico in southeastern North America (USA) indicate that transformations in vertebrate use occurred quickly. Over half of the vertebrate individuals in a Spanish collection associated with the first permanent European settlement on the Atlantic coast (Florida), British collections associated with Charles Towne (South Carolina), and French collections from the northern coast of the Gulf of Mexico (Alabama and Mississippi) are local wild vertebrates. This use of wild vertebrates occurred regardless of a colony’s national affiliation, the ethnicity of the colonists, or the century in which colonization occurred.

Keywords

Wild and domestic animal use Colonial foodways Southeastern United States Zooarchaeology 

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© Springer Science+Business Media New York 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Georgia Museum of Natural HistoryUniversity of GeorgiaAthensUSA
  2. 2.Center for Archaeological StudiesUniversity of South AlabamaMobileUSA

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