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International Journal of Historical Archaeology

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 559–576 | Cite as

These Are Not Old Ruins: A Heritage of the Hrun

  • Gísli Pálsson
Article

Abstract

The economic boom and subsequent collapse (Hrun) of the mid 2000s had a marked effect on Reykjavík, leaving various half-finished and empty structures with uncertain futures. Although the material culture of the economic collapse has been examined to some degree, the abandoned building sites have not. The Icelandic heritage discourse has so far had very little engagement with twentieth-century materiality and even less with twenty-first-century materiality but this paper contends that these places can nevertheless be seen as heritage. In order to engage with such places, the Icelandic authorized heritage discourse must be significantly broadened.

Keywords

Counter-heritage Ephemeral heritage Ruin gazing Ruins 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2012

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Architecture and Civil EngineeringUniversity of Bath, Claverton DownBathUK

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