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Poverty in the Modern City: Retrospects and Prospects

Abstract

The outcome of over fifteen years research on large urban assemblages from the Australian cities of Sydney and Melbourne is discussed in terms of approaches to the archaeology of the modern city as they have evolved over the period. To better understand the archaeology of urban poverty we require innovations in both methods and ideas, the most far-reaching being a transnational archaeology of urban poverty founded on the analysis of migration, consumption and class formation.

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Correspondence to Tim Murray.

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Murray, T. Poverty in the Modern City: Retrospects and Prospects. Int J Histor Archaeol 15, 572–581 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10761-011-0157-7

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Keywords

  • Urban
  • Poverty
  • Assemblage analysis
  • Migration
  • Consumption