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Sustainability and Scalability in Educational Technology Initiatives: Research-Informed Practice

Abstract

Although a positive impact of technology interventions on educational practice and student outcomes has been shown in many previous research settings, the use of technology in classrooms and schools is still often superficial and not meeting the potential of technology as envisioned by education reformers and researchers in the field. However, when technology projects have been implemented successfully in educational practice and shown valuable impacts, sustainability within similar contexts is not guaranteed—let alone scaling the initiative to other broader contexts. This article builds on the discussions of the EDUsummIT 2017 Thematic Working Group 9 (TWG9) and the summary report that captured the outcome of those discussions. The goal of TWG9 was to help inform policy and practice by providing insights into key factors that contribute to scalability and sustainability of educational technology integration and impact.

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Acknowledgements

We would like to thank the organizers of EDUsummIT 17 and acknowledge the contributions of EDUsummIT 2017 Thematic Working Group 9 members Punya Mishra and Lynn Schrum during the EDUsummIT discussions in Borovets, Bulgaria.

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Correspondence to Dale S. Niederhauser.

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Niederhauser, D.S., Howard, S.K., Voogt, J. et al. Sustainability and Scalability in Educational Technology Initiatives: Research-Informed Practice. Tech Know Learn 23, 507–523 (2018). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10758-018-9382-z

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10758-018-9382-z

Keywords

  • Technology integration
  • Sustainability
  • Scalability
  • Cases