EdTech Leaders’ Beliefs: How are K-5 Teachers Supported with the Integration of Computer Science in K-5 Classrooms?

Abstract

Educational Technology Leaders’ support of computer science teachers in K-5 classrooms are influenced by their beliefs about school-based program implementation criteria, available district-level support, and state mandates on the integration of computer science. The researcher in this study examines the beliefs about Computer Science teacher support, and training in five different Educational Tech Leaders’ districts, to determine sustainable implementation practices for K-5 schools. In order to effectively integrate computer science in K-5 instruction, administrators and program decision-makers must be aware of the beliefs Educational Technology Leaders hold related to the implementation process of programs, specifically related to the training of K-5 teachers who facilitate the computer science curricula in classrooms. Information reported in this study may inform school-level, district-level, and state-level decisions related to sustainable computer science program implementations.

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Funding

Funding was provided by the University of Redlands, School of Education’s Scholarly Project Fund.

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Correspondence to Nicol R. Howard.

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Howard, N.R. EdTech Leaders’ Beliefs: How are K-5 Teachers Supported with the Integration of Computer Science in K-5 Classrooms?. Tech Know Learn 24, 203–217 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10758-018-9371-2

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Keywords

  • Computer science
  • Elementary school
  • K-5
  • Educational technology