Understanding Career Mobility of Professors: Does Foreign-Born Status Matter?

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to seek to understand the mobility patterns of faculty members, with particular attention to foreign-born faculty members who work at 4-year colleges and universities in the United States. Examining data from the Survey of Doctorate Recipients, we looked at the mobility patterns of faculty members who held tenure-track faculty positions in 2003 and who responded to the survey again in 2013 (a 10-year time period). After examining different types of mobility, we found that the only significant difference was that, all things being equal, foreign-born faculty members were less likely to move into administration than U.S.-born faculty members. Foreign-born faculty members were no different from their U.S.-born counterparts in their mobility to other universities or to business/industry.

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Correspondence to Dongbin Kim.

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Kim, D., Twombly, S.B., Wolf-Wendel, L. et al. Understanding Career Mobility of Professors: Does Foreign-Born Status Matter?. Innov High Educ 45, 471–488 (2020). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10755-020-09513-x

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Keywords

  • Foreign-born professors
  • Academic mobility
  • Career mobility